MVP - Most Valuable Professional
rss

Just can't get enough of IT

This blog is about mostly anything in IT. But the primary focuses are Microsoft Technologies like Exchange, Office 365, Azure and Cloud Security.

Exchange Server 2013Exchange Server 2016Description

This script searches for OOF rules created by users using the Outlook rule-tab in the OOF assistant and deletes exisiting OOF rules.

In preparation to configure compliant Out-Of-Office (OFF) settings for users, any existing OOF rule needs to be deleted. The script will use either an exisiting Exchange Server EWS library or the Managed EWS library installed using the default file path.

This is the first of two scripts for the complete solution. Find the second script here.

The script access the mailbox rules using Exchange Web Services. Therefore the account executing the script either needs to have ApplicationImpersonation rights or full access to the user mailbox.

Requirements

Examples

# EXAMPLE 1
# Find any existing OOF rule and write results to log file
Remove-OOFRule 

# EXAMPLE 2
# Find and delete any existing OOF rules in all user mailboxes and write delete actions to log file
Remove-OOFRule -Delete

# EXAMPLE 3
# Find and delete any existing OOF rules for user SomeUser@varunagroup.de and write delete actions to log file
Remove-OOFRule -Mailbox SomeUser@varunagroup.de -Delete

Version History

  • 1.0, Initial community release

Links

Additional Credits

Rhoderick Milne (https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/rmilne)

Follow

 

 

Read More »

Exchange Server 2013Exchange Server 2016Description

This script sets the mailbox ExternalOofOptions to 'External' for members of a given security group.

ExternalOofOptions for users that are NOT a member of the security group will be set to 'InternalOnly'. If required the script will set the ExternalAudience to None and will delete an existing OOF message.

Controlling the ExternalOofOptions and ExternalAudience settings has been implemented to follow dedicated company compliance rules.

This is the second of two scripts for the complete solution. Find the first script here.

Requirements

Examples

# EXAMPLE
# Run script with default settings
.\Set-ExternalOOF.ps1

Version History

  • 1.0, Initial community release

Links

Follow

 

Read More »

Exchange Server 2013Exchange Server 2016Description

This script fetches emails from a given monitoring mailbox by searching email messages for a given subject string. In this case email messages sent by the ENow Management Suite (http://enowsoftware.com/). Status messages are parsed to extract Disk Performance alert data for further processing in Power BI.

The mailbox is queried using Exchange Web Services (EWS). The EWS endpoint is identified by AutoDiscover.

The script exports the following columns for further processing:

  • SERVER = Name of Exchange server reporting issue
  • DATE = Date of issue occurance (Short Date)
  • TIME = Time of issue occurance (Long Time)
  • IO = READ or WRITE
  • THRESHOLD = WARNING or CRITICAL
  • VALUE = reported value

You can easily adjust the script to fit your requirements. Search for other message subjects and parse for other content in the message body.

Requirements

  • Windows Server 2012 R2+ 
  • Exchange Server 2013+
  • Exchange Web Services Library

Examples

Code Samples

# Run script using default parameters
.\Get-EmailContent.ps1

Example output

"COMPUTER";"DATE";"TIME";"IO";"THRESHOLD";"VALUE"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"READ";"Critical";"109,90"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"WRITE";"Warning";"23,61"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"READ";"Critical";"80,13"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"WRITE";"Warning";"21,58"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"READ";"Warning";"33,01"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"READ";"Critical";"53,04"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"READ";"Warning";"24,24"
"EXLABP08";"19.05.2017";"11:15:38";"READ";"Warning";"40,01"

Power BI report examples

Power BI report based on CSV output

This example shows that P04 and P08 have exceeded the critical and warning state disk performance thresholds more often than the other servers.

The next example shows the same date in a different report.

Power BI report based on CSV output

Version History

  • 1.0, Initial community release

Links

Follow

 

Read More »

When you delete a public folder using a legacy Outlook client, you can easily restore the deleted folder and it's content using the Recover Deleted Items function. 

Due to a fancy trick implemented in Outlook 2013 and Outlook 2016 the recovered folder will not be recovered using it's full name.

This phenomenon has been verified with Exchange On-Premises and Exchange Online on the server side and Outlook 2013/2016 and Outlook 365 ProPlus.

The following example uses public folders in Exchange Online and Outlook 365 ProPlus.

Example

In this example I will delete and recover a public folder named My Public Folder.

Public folder hierarchy before deletion

After deletion of My Public Folder and it's content, I need to select the original parent folder and click the Recover Deleted Items button in the button bar.

Select original parent folder

Recover Deleted Items

The Recover Deleted Items dialogue opens and we select the deleted item for recovery. The dialogue displays the original name of the deleted folder.

Recover Deleted Items (DE)

After recovering the deleted folder the folder is recovered with the first character only.

Recovered public folder with first character only

That's an annoying result in regards to customer self-care when users restore deleted items on their own behalf.

But wait, there is a solution available.

Solution

The solution requires today's primary administrative tool available: PowerShell.

Step 1

Get an overview of public folders currently located in the public folder dumpster

Get-PublicFolder –Identity “\NON_IPM_SUBTREE” –Recurse 

Name             Parent Path
----             -----------
NON_IPM_SUBTREE
[...]
My Public Folder \NON_IPM_SUBTREE\DUMPSTER_ROOT\DUMPSTER_EXTEND\RESERVED_1\RESERVED_1\65722859-3...
Sub Folder 1     \NON_IPM_SUBTREE\DUMPSTER_ROOT\DUMPSTER_EXTEND\RESERVED_1\RESERVED_1\65722859-3...
Sub Folder 2     \NON_IPM_SUBTREE\DUMPSTER_ROOT\DUMPSTER_EXTEND\RESERVED_1\RESERVED_1\65722859-3...
[...]

 

Step 2

Export the list of public folders currently located in the public folder dumpster and find the identity of the deleted public folder you want to recover

Get-PublicFolder –Identity “\NON_IPM_SUBTREE” –Recurse  | fl | Out-File D:\TMP\publicfolderdumpster.txt

publicfolderdumpster.txt excerpt:


RunspaceId                     : 6ce9588e-829b-4592-aedc-85f9a2e2c963
Identity                       : \NON_IPM_SUBTREE\DUMPSTER_ROOT\DUMPSTER_EXTEND\RESERVED_1\RESERVED_1\65722859-366a-4e0
                                 9-81fe-ea576ec7a6f7\My Public Folder
Name                           : My Public Folder
MailEnabled                    : False
MailRecipientGuid              : 
ParentPath                     : \NON_IPM_SUBTREE\DUMPSTER_ROOT\DUMPSTER_EXTEND\RESERVED_1\RESERVED_1\65722859-366a-4e0
                                 9-81fe-ea576ec7a6f7

Step 3

Recover the deleted public folder to the correct parent target folder

Set-PublicFolder –Identity "\NON_IPM_SUBTREE\DUMPSTER_ROOT\DUMPSTER_EXTEND\RESERVED_1\RESERVED_1\65722859-366a-4e09-81fe-ea576ec7a6f7\My Public Folder" –Path “\TestFolders” –Verbose

As a result the public folder is recovered with it's original name.

Notes

There are some other things to consider when recovering deleted modern public folders.

Public folders originally located in the hierarchy root are always recovered to the public folder mailbox holding the primary hierarchy. 

Public folders originally located in the hierarchy root will replace the permissions of child public folders when restored. 

More on these default restore behaviours can be read here.

Links

Nevertheless, enjoy modern public folders.

 

 

Read More »

 

Exchange Server 2013 Exchange Server 2016 The PowerShell script to purge Exchange Server and IIS log files has been updated to version 2.0.

Release 2.0 allows for copying of files that will be deleted to be copied to a central file repository. The script will create a folder per server and the full log file folder structure will be preserved.

The next release will contain an option to compress the copied log files.

Added code:

function Copy-LogFiles {
  [CmdletBinding()]
  param(
    [string]$SourceServer,
    [string]$SourcePath,
    $FilesToMove
  )

  if($SourceServer -ne '') { 

    # path per SERVER for zipped archives
    $ServerRepositoryPath = Join-Path -Path $RepositoryRootPath -ChildPath $SourceServer

    # subfolder used as target for copying source folders and files
    $ServerRepositoryLogsPath = Join-Path -Path $ServerRepositoryPath -ChildPath $LogSubfolderName

    $ServerRepositoryPath = Join-Path -Path $RepositoryRootPath -ChildPath $SourceServer

    if(!(Test-Path -Path $ServerRepositoryPath)) {
      # Create new target directory for server, if does not exist
      $null = New-Item -Path $ServerRepositoryPath -ItemType Directory -Force -Confirm:$false
    }

    foreach ($File in $FilesToMove) {
      # target directory
      $targetDir = $File.DirectoryName.Replace($TargetServerFolder, $ServerRepositoryLogsPath)

      # target file path
      $targetFile = $File.FullName.Replace($TargetServerFolder, $ServerRepositoryLogsPath)
      
      # create target directory, if not exists
      if(!(Test-Path -Path $targetDir)) {$null = mkdir -Path $targetDir}

      # copy file to target
      $null = Copy-Item -Path $File.FullName -Destination $targetFile -Recurse -Force -Confirm:$false -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

    }-Force   
    
    if($ZipArchive) {
      # zip copied log files
      #
      <# NOT FULLY TESTED YET 
      $Archive = Join-Path -Path $ServerRepositoryPath -ChildPath $ArchiveFileName
      $logger.Write(('Zip copied files to {0}' -f $ArchiveFileName))

      if(Test-Path -Path $Archive) {Remove-Item $Archive -Force -Confirm:$false}

      Add-Type -AssemblyName 'System.IO.Compression.FileSystem'
      [IO.Compression.ZipFile]::CreateFromDirectory($ServerRepositoryLogsPath,$Archive)

      #>
    } 
  }  
}

Note

Links

Social

 

 

Read More »