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This blog is about mostly anything in IT. But the primary focuses are Microsoft Technologies like Exchange, Office 365, Azure and Cloud Security.
Last updated: 2019-09-26

 

Exchange Server 2007Exchange Server 2010Exchange Server 2013Exchange Server 2016Exchange Server 2019Description

 

This script creates an HTML report showing the following information about an Exchange 2019, 2016, 2013, 2010, and, to a lesser extent, 2007 and 2003 environment.

The report shows the following:

  •  As summary
    • Total number of servers per Exchange Server version
    • Total number of mailboxes per On-Premises Exchange Server version, Office 365, and Exchange Organisation
    • Total number of Exchange Server functional roles
       
  • Per Active Directory Site
    • Total number of mailboxes
    • Internal, External, and CAS Array names
    • Exchange Server computers
      • Product version
      • Service Pack, Update Rollup, and/or Cumulative Update
      • Number of preferred and maximum active databases
      • Functional Roles
      • Operating System with Service Pack
         
  • Per Database Availability Group
    • Total number of member servers
    • List of member servers
    • DAG databases
      • Number of mailboxes and average mailbox size
      • Number of archive mailboxes and average archive mailbox size
      • Database size
      • Database whitespace
      • Disk space available for database and log file volume
      • Last full backup timestamp
      • Circular logging enabled
      • Mailbox server hosting an active copy
      • List of mailbox servers hosting database copies
         
  • Per Database (Non-DAG, pre-DAG Exchange Server)
    • Storage group and database name
    • Server name hosting the database
    • Number of mailboxes and average mailbox size
    • Number of archive mailboxes and average archive mailbox size
    • Database size
    • Database whitespace
    • Disk space available for database and log file volume
    • Last full backup timestamp
    • Circular logging enabled
       

The script uses a separate CSS file for styling the HTML output.

 

Examples

# Example 1
# Generate an HTML report and send the result as HTML email with attachment 
# to the specified recipient using a dedicated smart host

.\Get-ExchangeEnvironmentReport.ps1 -HTMReport ExchangeEnvironment.html -SendMail `
-ViewEntireForet $true -MailFrom roaster@mcsmemail.de -MailTo grillmaster@mcsmemail.de -MailServer relay.mcsmemail.de

 

Example Screenshot

Example report Exchange Environment Report

 

Version History

  • 2.0, Initial community release
  • 2.1, Table header label updated for a more consistent labeling

 

Links

 

Additional Credits

Additional credits go to Steve Goodman for the original Exchange Environment Report V1.x scripts.

 

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Exchange Server 2016Exchange Server 2013Description

This script connects either to Exchange Online or to a dedicated on-premises Exchange Server to export configured mailbox delegates and SMTP forwarding configurations.

The SMTP forwarding configurations are gathered from inbox rules and from mailbox forwarding settings.

 

Requirements

  • Exchange Server 2016 or newer
  • Cretenials to logon to Exchange Online and Office 365 when querying EXO mailboxes
  • Utilizes GlobalFunctions PowerShell Module --> http://bit.ly/GlobalFunctions

 

Examples

# Example 1
# Connect to the on-premises Exchange Server mx01.varunagroup.de and export delegation and SMTP forwarding information
 
.\Get-DelegatesAndForwardingRules.ps1 -ExchangeHost mx01.varunagroup.de

# Example 2
# Connect to the on-premises Exchange Server mx01.varunagroup.de, export delegation and SMTP forwarding information and get verbose information on the objects worked on

 .\Get-DelegatesAndForwardingRules.ps1 -ExchangeHost mx01.varunagroup.de -Verbose 

# Example 3
# Connect to Exchange Online and export delegation and SMTP forwarding information

 .\Get-DelegatesAndForwardingRules.ps1 -ExchangeOnline

 

Version History

  • 1.0, Initial community release

 

Links

Use GitHub Issues to leave comments, requests, end even bugs or issues.

 

Additional Credits

The script is based on the O365-InvestigationTooling script DumpDelegatesandForwardingRules.ps1 by Brandon Koeller
Find more Office 365 investigation tooling scripts at https://github.com/OfficeDev/O365-InvestigationTooling.

 

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The Exchange PowerShell script (Set-ReceiveConnectorIpAddress) to add or remove remote IP address ranges to/from Exchange Server 2013+ receive connectors received an update.

The script now checks if the required PowerShell modules are available before failing to load the modules.

Get the most recent version at Github or TechNet Gallery

 

As always, enjoy Exchange Server On-Premises.

 

 

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SharePoint Saturday Cologne | 2019-05-11On Saturday, May 11th, the SharePoint Saturday Cologne will take place at Microsoft Office.

My session covers the migration of legacy public folders to modern public folders in the cloud.

Migrating from legacy public folders to modern public folders in Exchange Online is an error-prone process. Especially for Exchange organizations using legacy public folders since the early days. Real world examples from the field will show you how to determine the right migration approach. Additional information will help you to avoid the most common errors when migrating to modern public folders to the cloud. But what about after migrating to the? There is more. Prepare for decommissioning Public Folders by moving content to Microsoft Teams.

 

Links

 

See you in Cologne.

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This post was originally published on April, 1st, 2019 on http://JustCantGetEnough.Granikos.eu


Exchange Server 2019 is the most recent release of the successful email messaging solution, introduced by Microsoft in 1996. Since the early days of the product supported a single primary email address only. The primary email address is used as the sender address when a user composes a new email message and sends the message. A mailbox can have multiple email addresses to receive messages for, but only one so-called reply-address. 

But the limitation is not valid anymore.

A recent build of the Exchange Server 2019 Cumulative Update 1 released to VLSC contains a new feature called Multi-Reply Addresses

This new feature is very helpful in scenarios where a single user sends email messages for multiple companies. Think of a business owner who is responsible for two or more companies. In the past, it was required to configure a mailbox account per primary email address used as a reply address. Such a configuration resulted not only on multiple inboxes but in multiple calendars and contact folders as well. 

The new Multi-Reply Addresses feature of Exchange Server 2019 provides a much better solution. Moreover, it is a CEO-safe solution.

 

How it works

After enabling the multi-reply feature in your Exchange Organization the new functionality is available in Exchange Admin Center and Exchange Management Shell.

When you edit the email address properties using the Edit User Mailbox dialogue of an existing mailbox you can add additional reply addresses. 

  • Click Add reply address button to add an additional textbox to add a new reply address
  • Select the checkbox to ensure that all addresses are used as available reply addresses
  • Click OK to save the changes

The following screenshot illustrates the steps.

Adding additional reply addresses

 

When you close the Edit User Mailbox dialogue the additonal reply addresses and the status are displayed in the recipient list view and the detail pane.

The following screenhot shows how the reply addresses are displayed in the list view and how the status is displyed in the detail pane. 

Recipient Overview w/ multi-reply addresses

 

You can verify the updated proxyAddresses Active Directory attibute using ADSIEdit or the Attribute Viewer of the ADUC MMC. 

Active Directory proxyAddresses attribute

 

When you compose a new email message using Outlook on the Web, the From selector is displayed automatically. You can select one of the configured reply email addresses as the sender address. 

Composing a new new email message with enabled multi-reply addresses

 

You can configure separate email signatures for each available reply address.

A user can select Options - Mail - Email signature to open the Email signature form. The form provides a new option to set a different email siganture for each reply address. 

Outlook on the Web - Email signature management w/ multi-reply email addresses

 

This is a really exciting new feature.

 

 

How to enable the Multi-Reply feature

You can enable the new multi-reply function using the following new Exchange Cmdlet:

# Enable Multi-Reply functionality in Exchange Server 2019
Enable-SmtpMultiReply 

# Disable Multi-Reply functionality in Exchange Server 2019
Disable-SmtpMultiReply -CleanupPrimarySmtp -Force 

When disabling the Multi-Reply feature a all but one primary SMTP address is converted to a legacy proxy smtp address.

You need to be assigned permissions before you can run this cmdlet. It is required to be assigned to the Elevated Exchange Organization Management role.

 

Things to come

  • The multi-reply or multi-primary email address engine does not support email address policies. You must activate and manage additional address manually using the Exchange Admin Center or Exchange Management Shell.
  • Another interesting feature on the roadmap is the feature to include the management of multi-reply address to the users' mailbox policy. This option will allow end users to edit configured reply-addresses on their own.
  • Outlook 2019 support for this feature. It's currently availabke in on-premises Outlook on the Web only.

I do not know if the new feature had been exposed accidentally, but the on-premises version of the Exchange Server 2019 benefits from this new feature. This is a true differentiator to the cloud-based service of Exchange Online.

 

Links

 

Enjoy Exchange Server 2019!

 


 

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